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This week from CPR’s Arts Bureau: Cultural tax up north, SXSW and more
Colorado Public Radio

March 13, 2015

Wheelchair Sports Camp plays at the Colorado Music Party at SXSW 2014
(Photo: Dave Fender)

Check out his week's in-depth coverage of the Colorado culture scene from CPR's Arts Bureau here:
Arts happenings around Colorado this weekend:
Coverage from CPR's arts bureau is now also available as a weekly podcast via iTunes and the NPR podcast directory.

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This week from CPR’s Arts Bureau: New jazz club, navigating Denver using poetry and more
Colorado Public Radio

March 6, 2015

Outside Nocturne, Denver's new jazz club (Photo: Corey Jones)

Check out this week's in-depth coverage of the Colorado culture scene from CPR's Arts Bureau here.

The owners of the soon-to-open Nocturne nightclub, located in Denver's River North neighborhood, hope its presence will inspire a resurgence of jazz music in a city once known as the "Harlem of the West." As the club prepares to open its doors, CPR arts reporter Corey H. Jones examined the cyclical nature of the Denver's jazz scene.

From the smoke-filled music joints of Five Points to the swanky hotels of mountain towns, jazz has long been an important part of Colorado's musical landscape. KBCO morning host Bret Saunders spoke with Colorado Matters' Ryan Warner about the state's jazz legacy.

A University of Colorado Boulder graduate student and poet has come up with an unusual way to navigate the streets, parks and buildings of Denver -- using poetry. CPR arts editor Chloe Veltman met up with Aaron Angello to learn about his Denver Poetry Map app.

The CU Art Museum in Boulder will be the only Colorado stop on the first-ever national touring exhibition of Shakespeare's First Folio, the original collected edition of the Bard's plays. CPR's Stephanie Wolf talked with the museum about the other events and larger exhibition that will coincide with the Folio's stay and commemorate the 400-year anniversary of the playwright's death. 

Colorado is home to hundreds of hot springs. Former Rocky Mountain News reporter Deborah Frazier profiles 44 of them in the third edition of her book, "Colorado's Hot Springs." Frazier shares the stories she unearthed while researching the guidebook, as well as six remote spots she calls "wild" springs.

Longmont banjo player Jayme Stone collaborated with 14 other musicians to put a spin on folk songs for a new album. CPR's Ryan Warner spoke with Stone about his sampling of the extensive roots music collection of folklorist Alan Lomax.

The two-day music festival "Gentleman of the Road Tour" could bring as many as 35,000 visitors to Colorado when it makes a stop in Salida in August. While some are excited for the event, others say the small town doesn't have the infrastructure to support the crowds.

Boulder a cappella group Ars Nova Singers will look skyward this weekend, as it presents four concerts at Boulder's Fiske Planetarium. CPR Classical dives deeper into the programming, which features the music of Arvo Part, Meredith Monk and Philip Glass, accompanied by massive visual elements.

Colorado musicians Chris Daniels and Freddi Gowdy have joined forces and mixed influences for their new album, "Funky to the Bone." The two sat down with CPR's Ryan Warner to talk about the ups and downs of band life and the funky flashback that fueled their latest tunes.

Arts happenings around Colorado this weekend: CPR’s Arts Bureau spotlights this weekend’s Colorado cultural happenings, including a groundbreaking vocal ensemble, a classic Edward Albee play and more.

Coverage from CPR's arts bureau is now also available as a weekly podcast via iTunes and the NPR podcast directory.

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With a poetry map, a new way to navigate Denver
Colorado Public Radio

Denver Poetry Map creator Aaron Angello in Cheesman Park, Denver


To read and listen to the full story, click here.

Aaron Angello first noticed the powerful relation between poetry and place around five years ago while working on his doctorate in English literature at the University of Colorado Boulder. “We read Charles Olsen’s “Maximus,” poems which take place in Gloucester, and Lorraine Niedecker’s “Paeon to Place” -- all these poems which are specifically tied to location,” Angello says of a class he took which examined the relationship between poetry and place.

That lead Angello to create the Denver Poetry Map, a map that enlivens Denver with poems inspired by specific locations around the city.

“My initial impulse was, 'How I can I get some of these incredibly talented poets to write poems that are somehow associated with very specific places?'” Angello says. “So that you could actually go to that place, read the poem and have some sort of experience of the relationship between the poem itself and the space.”

It's all part of Angello's doctoral research on the intersection between digital technology and the humanities. The digital side only took him a few days. He built the site last November, using Google Maps. Then, he reached out to the Front Range poetry community for contributions to populate the map.

Some poets were initially confused about the assignment, thinking they had to write verses about a specific place. But Angello says he welcomes more nuanced connections between poems and locations.

“I’m interested in the more abstract connections to place that a poem can have -- what in a place might inspire something in a poem?” Angello says.

The Denver Poetry Map currently has nearly 50 locations on it and Angello plans to keep adding new poems as they come in from contributors.

“I want more and more people to read the poetry that’s written in and about Denver,” Angello says. “I hope that it keeps going, growing and filling up with poems.”

To read and listen to the full story, click here.

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This week from CPR’s Arts Bureau: Arts/pot crossover, Denver kids fulfill singing dreams & more
Colorado Public Radio

February 27, 2015

Andrew Wilkes plays Jimmy Harper in the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center's production of “Reefer Madness.” (Photo: Jeff Kearney)

Check out this week's in-depth coverage of the Colorado culture scene from CPR's Arts Bureau here.

With its production of the satirical musical “Reefer Madness,” the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center is the latest in a fast-growing list of Colorado cultural institutions experimenting with pot industry partnerships. CPR arts reporter Stephanie Wolf examines why the state’s arts and pot scenes are getting cozy.

Three Denver fifth-graders beat out more than 3,300 children from around the country to sing with the National Honor Choir in Salt Lake City. CPR education reporter Jenny Brundin spoke with the students about why they love to sing.

Quentin Tarantino's "Hateful Eight" movie shoot continues to boost Telluride's economy, as evidenced by a Telluride tire shop's record sales. CPR arts reporter Corey H. Jones spoke with Telluride Tire owner Stuart Armstrong.

In 1925, Edith Lake Wilkinson was committed to an insane asylum, and her artwork was packed away in a trunk for 40 years. Fort Collins-based songstress Danielle Anderson, known onstage as Danielle Ate the Sandwich, recently scored a documentary about the artist. She talked with CPR's Ryan Warner about setting music to this sad story.

Colorado College senior Rebecca Celli answered five questions about her "Silenced Film Series," a series of talks and screenings she organized in Colorado Springs to highlight the inequalities within the film industry.

For the first time ever, a Colorado music festival received the “Music Festival of the Year” recognition at the Pollstar Concert Industry Awards in Nashville. Planet Bluegrass, which runs Telluride Bluegrass Festival, tells CPR it was an unexpected honor.

The Denver Center for the Performing Arts named Scott Shiller as its new CEO and president Thursday. Shiller, who has been executive vice president of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, will replace Daniel Ritchie. His tenure begins May 1.

Bluegrass musician Jake Schepps' latest album, "Entwined," features songs that veer between traditional sounds and contemporary classical. Schepps sat down with Colorado Matters host Ryan Warner to talk about how contemporary classical composers inspired his latest tracks.

The City Council of Woodland Park, a small city in the Pikes Peak region, approved the installation of a 125-foot mural last week. CPR arts editor Chloe Veltman reports on how the artwork will use technology to connect visitors with the region's history seeped in Native American culture.

Arts happenings around Colorado this weekend: CPR’s Arts Bureau spotlights this weekend’s Colorado cultural happenings, including a musical rendition of the film "Big Fish," Estonian music, a West African festival and more.

Coverage from CPR's arts bureau is now also available as a weekly podcast via iTunes and the NPR podcast directory.

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This week from CPR’s Arts Bureau: Moving past apartheid, the music of 1968 and more
Colorado Public Radio

February 20, 2015

Handbill for Canned Heat at the Family Dog, March 27, 1968.
(Photo: History Colorado)


Check out this week's in-depth coverage of the Colorado culture scene from CPR's Arts Bureau here.

A viral racist video made by four white students at a South African university in 2008 inspired Donna Bryson’s debut book, “It’s a Black White Thing.” The former AP Johannesburg bureau chief, who now lives in Denver, spoke with Colorado Matters’ Elaine Grant about a nation still struggling to move past apartheid.

In 1968, bands like Cream, the Jimi Hendrix Experience and Big Brother & the Holding Company performed in Colorado. History Colorado’s Elisa Phelps gave Colorado Matters host Ryan Warner a rock history lesson and explained how this music reflected the social and political upheaval of the time.

Martin Luther King Jr. first heard “If I Can Help Somebody” at a Denver church in 1956. Vern L. Howard, chair of Denver’s Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Commission, told CPR’s Ryan Warner the story of how the hymn became one of King’s favorites. The Spirituals Project Choir will perform it at the Lakewood Cultural Center Sunday.

On Feb. 25, Colorado Public Television will debut “If Not Us,” a documentary about a project that uses storytelling to explore social and civic activism themes.

International music festival Bravo! Vail unveiled its 2015 season earlier this week. The concert lineup includes performances by the New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra and the Dallas Symphony, among others.

The Colorado Music Party will return to Austin for its third year to host an unofficial event happening alongside the South By Southwest (SXSW) music festival. Colorado artists performing this year include In the Whale, Bonnie and the Beard, The Yawpers and more. Bands like Inner Oceans and SPELLS will also play the official festival.

Denver street artist Jolt is guest curating Westword's annual Artopia. The events combine art, music and fashion on Saturday at Denver's City Hall club. Jolt tells CPR News that he wants to bring the focus back to the art.

This summer, Colorado will get the first peak at new independent television shows looking to make it big on the small screen. The inaugural SeriesFest will screen pilot programs and other content from around the world and host panels during a four-day festival in Denver.

A destructive rampage carried out in Colorado in 2004 inspired a Russian film that's up for Best Foreign Language Film at Sunday's Academy Awards ceremony. "Leviathan" director Andrey Zviyagintsev spoke with CPR arts editor Chloe Veltman about adapting what he calls a universal story and adding a more Russian ending.

Arts happenings around Colorado this weekend: CPR’s Arts Bureau spotlights this weekend’s Colorado cultural happenings, including “Artopia,” winter bluegrass festivals, a world premiere at the Denver Performing Arts Center and more.

Coverage from CPR's arts bureau is now also available as a weekly podcast via iTunes and the NPR podcast directory.

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This week from CPR’s Arts Bureau: Kids sing in 14 languages, bluegrass frontman goes solo and more
Colorado Public Radio

February 6, 2015

Colorado Children's Chorale (Photo: Michael Hughes)

Check out this week's in-depth coverage of the Colorado culture scene from CPR's Arts Bureau here.

For the first time in its 84-year history, the Alpine World Ski Championships has a choir-in-residence -- the Colorado Children’s Chorale. CPR arts reporter Stephanie Wolf spoke with the young singers about the difficult task of learning 14 national anthems.

Mandolinist and songwriter Jeff Austin co-founded the successful bluegrass ensemble the Yonder Mountain String Band. He talked with CPR art editor Chloe Veltman about striking out on his own and hitting the road with his new solo album.

The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park recently held a contest seeking designs for a hedge maze inspired by the horror film “The Shining” to be built on one of its lawns. The hotel announced the winner on Thursday. CPR arts reporter Corey H. Jones covered the story.

Nick Urata of the Denver indie rock band Devotchka scored the music for the film “Paddington,” which opened on Jan. 16. He explains to Colorado Matter’s Elaine Grant how he crafted music to capture the many emotions imbued in this beloved childhood story about a bear who adores marmalade sandwiches.

As property values rise and activity booms in Denver's River North Arts District, artists are struggling to stay in the neighborhood they helped build. CPR arts reporter Corey H. Jones investigated how the city intends to keep the area affordable for artists.

Journalist-turned-dramatist Rick Padden’s play “Beets” is inspired by the real-life events that occurred on northern Colorado sugar beet farms during World War II. Padden spoke with CPR’s Chloe Veltman about how he adapted these stories for the stage.

Arts happenings around Colorado this weekend: CPR’s Arts Bureau spotlights this weekend’s Colorado cultural happenings, including a dulcimer music festival in Littleton and an exhibition of memorabilia and artifacts that flashback to 1968 at the History Colorado Center.

Coverage from CPR's arts bureau is now also available as a weekly podcast via iTunes and the NPR podcast directory.

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This week from CPR’s Arts Bureau: Hick’s cultural plan, history dramatized & more
Colorado Public Radio

February 2, 2015

German prisoners of war pose for a photo on a Niwot sugar beet farm in 1944. (Photo: Courtesy of Records of the Colorado Cooperative Extension, Colorado Agriculture Archive, CSU Morgan Library)

Check out this week's in-depth coverage of the Colorado culture scene from CPR's Arts Bureau:

CPR’s Arts Bureau joined Colorado Gov. John Hicklenlooper, who recently received the National Award for State Arts Leadership, at the State Capitol to ask him about his plans for the Colorado arts and culture scene in 2015. He tells CPR arts editor Chloe Veltman he intends to up the strategy rather than funding.

As property values rise and activity booms in Denver's River North Arts District, artists are struggling to stay in the neighborhood they helped build. CPR arts reporter Corey H. Jones investigates how the city intends to keep the area affordable for artists.

Journalist-turned-dramatist Rick Padden’s play “Beets” is inspired by the real-life events that occurred on northern Colorado sugar beet farms during World War II. Padden speaks with CPR’s Chloe Veltman about how he adapted these stories for the stage.

In this week’s Book Club segment, three award-winning Colorado authors -- Peter Heller, Helen Thorpe and Lisa Jones -- discuss some of their favorite South Asian authors.

Rags Over the Arkansas River (ROAR), a group devoting to derailing world-famous artist Christo’s project titled “Over the River,” filed a notice to appeal a federal court’s ruling that allowed the installation over the Arkansas River to move forward.

With help from Make-A-Wish Colorado, 14-year-old leukemia patient Gianella Falcon Escobedo will fulfill her musical aspirations and perform with the Colorado Symphony at Boettcher Concert Hall Friday night.

Denver's annual Kohaku Uta Gassen, a 40-year-old Japanese singing competition, pits two teams of men and women vocalists against each other. CPR’s Chloe Veltman examines the innovations the contest organizers are implementing to keep it going.

Denver’s Clyfford Still Museum appointed visual artist and former DEVO band member Mark Mothersbaugh as its first-ever guest curator.

Arts happenings around Colorado this weekend: CPR’s Arts Bureau spotlights this weekend’s Colorado cultural happenings, including a Western Slope folk ensemble performing in Ridgway and two one-act plays by South Asian-born Denver playwrights.

Coverage from CPR's arts bureau is now also available as a weekly podcast via iTunes and the NPR podcast directory.

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